Spring 2017 – Matthew Unangst Research Assignment #4

Research Assignment #4

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DO NOT MAKE A NEW POST FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT – EDIT YOUR POST FROM RA 1,2,&3

Having identified a contemporary news article, at least one historical primary source, and at least three secondary sources, and having outlined your project, in research assignment #3, you will now draft the full historical narrative. See sample research assignment #4 for what this should look like when you are finished.

DO NOT COPY THE FORMAT OF THE SAMPLE EXACTLY. FIGURE OUT A STRUCTURE THAT MAKES SENSE FOR YOUR TOPIC, SOURCES, AND CHRONOLOGY.

Step 1. Using the databases available to you, locate at least one additional primary source created before 1980 and one additional secondary source. Integrate those sources into your narrative.

Step 2. Draft the full narrative of your project, including an expansion of your thesis statement into a full thesis paragraph (located immediately after your hook paragraph) and 6-8 well-developed body paragraphs. The thesis paragraph does two things. First, it establishes your main argument – the answer to your research question. Second, it states how you intend to “prove” your argument or make your case using historical evidence. See the Writing a Thesis and Making an Argument guide for ideas or sample research assignment #4 for an example. Keep in mind that you should integrate your original primary source analysis narratives into this draft (likely with some revision) in an appropriate chronological place.

*While certainly beneficial to begin now, you may save the writing of your concluding paragraph until research assignment #5, after you’ve had time to review comments and make revisions to this first draft.

Step 3. Amend your endnotes section based on the introduction of new sources or the insertion of older sources in new places within the project. Endnotes included throughout the narrative itself should appear in sequential numerical order (even if you’re using a source more than once). The endnotes section at the end should appear in that same order.

After completion, you will receive comments on ways to refine your analysis, the necessity of different or additional sources, and the clarity and historical nature of your thesis paragraph.